Making, the Big Unsure

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Making, the Big Unsure

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I make things.

I do not care if anyone likes what I make (not being rude).

I have to make my own satisfaction, joy, or come up with further questions—like, “This was fun. Now, what’s next?”

This is fun.

If I wonder, “Yeah, but is it good?”

Sure it is. Just keep in mind what I made is temporary. It might show up in archaeology but I cannot hold my breath for that long, neither could the cave painters.

“But will others like it?”

Try that path out.

• Rejection is temporary.

• Be a moving target.

• Praise is fleeting.

So back to me and what I made.

Yeah, it’s good.

“Is it useful?”

Stoppit.

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c. Lemuel

07 November 2018

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Art is a Verb

Recently I heard a critical response to a fellow artist’s use of some vintage wood in a design. They used 100 year-old wood in their art which was deemed a “waste” by the responder.

lumber4

 

I wish only to explore what “stops the creative process” at this point.

Why was it a waste to use that rare wood?

“If the wood could be used in a more ‘worthy’ application, then it would be a proper use of the material.”  If the wood were made into a fine altar piece or carved doors to a crypt, then it would be something more notable.

Nope.

I wonder in this manner sometimes when I make something new, even one-of-a-kind piece from found objects. Certainly few recycled things I have come a provenance or even an estimation of age. None are any sort of rare things other than they had been “lost”, they piqued my interest, and I re-defined them.

Paint remaining in tubes for fear of waste might deter me if I allowed. The costs of paper, canvas, and brushes do frighten me when I order materials.

But, what if I do not get “it” right?

Do I feel guilty when I fail the materials and decide to start over? Does starting over prove I am un-wise?

Nope and nope.

If every time I failed I stopped the process and cleaned up the materials and placed everything back where it belongs and quit I have only accomplished only an exercise in studio cleaning, and turning off the lights.

Do I fail often?

Yep.

I simply begin again, almost out of reflex. I have yet to understand why starting over is such a “horrid consequence”, a waste. [I’m thinking maybe also stay ahead of deadlines, because missing them qualifies as a “horrid consequence”.]

Why is “waste” such a driving concept?

I think it is rooted in fear of failing. If I mess up this cut, then I’ve ‘ruined’ a piece of 100 year-old wood and the wasting wood cops are sitting in a van outside.

Yep, it is the same with anyone who might mess up vintage lumber or a box of nails.

If the piece of  100 year-old wood rests on the shelf for another hundred years perhaps it will be a buffet for termites.

If and if and if must end. It stops the creative process.

Art is verb, it is about doing.

I Artist, Sometimes I Open the Box

Cigar Box of Inspiration left flip1

Urban archaeology: A find whilst junking. It was under a 1964 scrapbook.

 

The following good questions are about “how ideas originate”. And my, with hope, helpful attempt to give a “full” but direct answer. These are perennial questions. I like them. I wonder too. I should never get tired of hearing them because they are wonder questions. How does one go from ‘nothing’ to ‘something’?

 Q: So, what inspires you?

A: What does and what does not.

Example: Doodles do inspire me. Being part of rush hour does not inspire me , which is a personal epistemological squib.

 

Q: Where do you get ideas?

A: By thinking.

 

Q: What was the most recent time you were inspired?

 Short

A : Today, when I looked inside an old cigar box.

Long 

A: I scrounged a fifty-year old cigar box with a few pencils inside. I sharpened a blunted stump of a scared and pitted half-inch round  red pencil. I doodled with it in a scrap paper practice pad I keep handy. Then I got excited with the doodle and now it is going to be a color drawing.

So, the most recent time I was inspired was today, when I looked inside an old cigar box. I wondered if any of those vintage pencils still worked.

At least one of them did still work.

What can be Will Be

My usual method to assemblage starts with some kind of “ground” or what receives all the pieces. Then comes the parts arrangement. Take a picture; then, re-arrange the components, and finally take another picture.

Flow of the Cosmos2

“Star Fountain”, wood, metal, acrylic paint, varnish, April 2016

I’ve  mixed it up a bit.  I take a picture of the parts and cut them out, then arrange those cut-outs on a backdrop.

I thought, “Forget the pictures.”

Designs?

Where am I?

I’m stuck is where I am.

I have to do better. Don’t give up.

Opportunity to re-start.

 

I was jammed. Run hard a-ground.

What I used to make this project was one word: altered.

I altered the plan.

It worked. Same parts different approach. New concept.

I got un-stuck.

New tool for my tool box.

What can be will be.

Eventually.

Stay in the hunt.

Parts Make a Whole

Fuel Filter Lamp 1

I walked passed the collection of automotive parts everyday for several months.  The 1960 Willys Jeep fuel pump was near the top of the heap. I liked the “AC” glass bowl.

I disassembled and cleaned the fuel pump. Then, the un-necessary bits were removed.

 

Then my curiosity was growing. What else was lurking in that scrap?

I found more parts–outside house lights. I began to get a sense of what “the fuel pump” could become.

The assembly process was trial and error. Error gets me going with more determination.

I needed some bits to enhance “the fuel pump”.

I was given a cord coupler. Nice threads.

Bartered for a brass plate for a base. Scrap brass sheet and couplings for contrasting color.

I bought a toggle switch.

 

I call it a “Lamp” from a 1960 Willys Jeep fuel pump.

 

Fuel Filter Lamp 2

 

 

 

Ray Gun

What Does a Ray Gun Look Like?

The year is 1898 H. G. Wells has written a novel The War of the Worlds. In that novel there is an early mention of a ray gun called the “heat-ray”. The Martians did some serial work on humanity. I do mean serial destruction.

More than a century passes and the Overlords of space opera and design technology have employed props called ray guns, blasters, zap-guns, or  phasers carried from one end of the universe to our own backyards.

What does a ray gun look like?  Design one– what I can construct from my stash and mash them up will equal a ray gun.

  • Shape
  • Function
  • Emotion

So the request I got goes something like this–

Needed:  discrete Steampunk ray gun for a gentleman’s waistcoat or a lady’s purse.

March 2016 Ray Gun 2

This ray gun is a composite for fancy-dress-up events that others call costume role-play or cos-play.  The ray gun is an artifact of someone’s life. It means something to them. It is a unique ray gun. It will accessorize their ‘get-up’—Shape, Function, Emotion.

I built several one off’s and displayed them on a table. Then there were none.

I was happy.

No one asked for a special construction, just bring more next time they said.

Art is fun.

Keep art fun.

 

How do you make your designs? Not just ray guns, but everything.

Be welcome to comment on this page.