NaPoWriMo 2018, My View

NaPoWriMo 2018 banner 2

 

I make poems and I love a good story.

As with many writing-type people I like to start crafting a poem with an idea, a feeling, or even a title. I truly appreciate the writing prompts or the suggestions being the sort that makes a shared challenge all the more enjoyable. Knowing others are struggling with or breezing through the daily prompt or challenge makes me smile inwardly somehow.

If it is competition, then it’s the good kind; that brings out the best I can make; the funniest, the most somber, the largest word discard pile ever, maybe, even doggerel all of which I have produced with pixel, pencil, and pen.

The number one reason for my first time at participating in NaPoWriMo is learning something new. So, my own challenge is to practice a new or different poetic form with each poem of the month—I don’t think I’ll run out by day thirty. That’s my personal goal for National Poetry Writing Month 2018. I am knocked out by such a great idea like this annual ‘get-together’ to focus on a form of communication as old as civilization, perhaps much, much older.

Ancient cave paintings I think were our first cinemas. Dark places where a little light means so much, sequestered in mystery, how many stories were told there in the flickering lights, moving depictions, imagination sparked from real-life actions, or dreams hoped for etched and painted on magical walls.

We supply the emotion. The poems are our launch pads our magical walls. The prompts offer words and the poets distill them to their essence.

The word-pictures tell about our world, poems release us from the mundane or help us to see it in a new light, or even cast a shadow for contrast and new interest.

When we sleep at night we swim in a shared ocean and watch the cinema of the human mind, both deep immersion.

 

© Lemuel

14 April, 2018

#NationalPoetryWritingMonth2018

#NaPoWriMo2018

http://www.napowrimo.net/

 

 

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Vintage Manual Typewriters, Captivating

Captivating

    Typewriter Olympia SM9 frontal pic1

For writing I chose a portable manual typewriter.  The venerable writing machines are captivating old technology that still convey messages and data to others. Typewriters of this ilk are productive with only human power. The use of these machines has given me new insights into my writing process.

I do not reject the “instant”, the digital, nor the have-it-your-way-now world. I watch as words develop instantly on the monitor. I enjoy digital spell checker. I add new words to the computer’s dictionary my way. I still produce documents with typos.

That is my feint in making comparisons. From my view there are no comparisons I find compelling, digital versus manual. In short, I am a different writer when I use a typewriter.

There it is, the human aspect of humane letters or writing the latest RSVP. I could text my response to an invitation. “Write and sent. Done and done,” next task please, “and done”, very efficient, slightly cold and clammy.

I chose to type or hand write a reply since the sender used an envelope and a stamp to get my attention. I responded in kind. Also, I am engaged in a different way.

I might ride a motorcycle or I might ride a horse. I love them both. I go from point A to point “” however I can. I am a different rider on a large sentient animal than one astride a large engine connected by two wheels.

The differences make me different, that is captivating.

Suddenly Prose

Suddenly

Adverbs are one of the spices of life, a word like “suddenly” is so serviceable in prose.

Suddenly reminds me of a bird story that plays out regularly. I am a most irksome neighbor. Given the passel of dove that loves my yard I so often damage their calm and send them into full throttle emergency dove take off. The scene is a blur of color; they explode into the air, and make that tinkling bell sound as they gain altitude.  Off they roar into the protective branches of a pine tree still within sight of me, their heads bobbing, they eyeball me guardedly.

I have not become accustomed to their surprising aerial escapes nor have I stopped being amazed at how suddenly they forget all the bother from a few seconds ago. I hastily scatter some food and I disappear, then, they return, land, and un-scatter, perhaps still wary, and suddenly make the dove chow disappear from the grass.

pexels-photo-203088.jpegSuddenly tells how something is accomplished.  Suddenly soup is just not in my DNA. I admit one thing is better done quickly. Sticky bandages adhering to my mammalian skin I am looking at you.

I love slow brewed tea. I would be confused if sunsets were suddenly over. Floodwater suddenly receding from my door is fabulous.

Telling how something gets done is made suddenly easier by employing adverbs. Then, given a little time the other parts of speech can get to work and help the writer make something of meaning.

Jack Frost, a Nano Story 2017

When I sit still I can get an idea for a story or for a drawing. It seems when I am busy or driving down the highway I get more ideas. Used to be in the shower. Now it’s commuting or chopping weeds.

11.06.17 Jack Frost p

The idea of seasons has the connotation of change or exclusivity as in “seasonal produce”. We must be ever mindful of how we alter our world.

 

 

 

All content on this blog is proprietary intellectual property. No use is granted in any format for any reason.

(c) 2017 Lemuel

 

Writing, Making Adjustments

I write stories and some of them are very short or as I call them, Nano Stories. These are  “imaginary books and their stories” with the entire bibliographical citation  “made-up”.  I write all through the year and I really concentrate on my Nano Stories in November as the time changes, evenings darken more quickly and the mornings are misty and bleak.

11.01.17 Vegan p

Typed words of another era.

I use vintage typewriters, index cards, or small sheets of paper to compose my Nano Stories and most times make the final story for a type-cast that I post online. The clicktey-clack of typing slugs (the letters) striking the paper show up on social media, like in this blog, or on someone’s feed, or on tee-shirts as typed words of another era.

I was approached to make one such Nano Story that was less than a hundred words a bit longer. “You know, fill out the details, involve other characters, and stretch it some, plot twists are always good.”

I reckoned the story was compact and gave all it could in less than one hundred words. I offered to write a different story more likely to fit their need.

“Nope,” this story in question was just the ticket for some ‘filler stories’ in an anthology. I offered several more of my Nano Stories to help fill the ‘holes’ in the up-coming story collection book.

“Nope, fix this one, please.” I liked the polite tone so I set to work fixing my story that I didn’t know needed repaired.

I worked on it for three days on and off. The story would not budge.

When I was next contacted, “How’s that re-write going. Did you get it stretched out some?”

“Nope.”

“Well, that’s too bad.”

“Yep, sometimes if you stretch a story out beyond its intended boundaries the reader will see through it then everyone is embarrassed.”

My story didn’t make the book.

 

As a side note, vintage typewriters have made a counter-cultural come-back of sorts. Will the old machines become mainstream? Let’s wait to see. The Revolution will be typewritten!

11.03.17 Coal Hogs Love Robots wm

Type-cast version of a Nano Story. The stories involve the use of “vintage” typewriters.