Be Productive

Success Go Get It

 

Every “project” has a beginning, middle, and an end. The end is called the deadline or the delivery time.

Everyone approaches work a little bit personal but we all serve the deadline.

In a positive light always be productive.

  • Be on the job consistently.
  • Keep regular work hours.
  • Keep your promises.
  • Produce your best work.
  • Go above and beyond as a routine. Over-deliver.
  • Listen to your clients/audience.
  • Listen some more to your clients/audience.
  • Talk to your clients/audience.
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Achievement and Improvement

Bicyclist

Achievement starts with being pretty good, even producing pretty good Art. In that manner of thinking a person is already a success, a known quantity, being pretty good. But what sort of success?

As I remember learning to ride a bicycle, success lies fundamentally in making allowance for the person in their chosen activity shins and elbows notwithstanding.

From being pretty good the daily practice, hours of effort, the inevitable stops all make new beginnings  more readily undertaken. We must really, really want to ride a bicycle to achieve it.

Before long you’re sailing along, “ready,steady, go”.  The bumps and bruises are what make an interesting person of you.

What a boring endeavor Art would be without stops and new beginnings.

Imagine Winning

When I think about winning I imagine I’m rocking a child to sleep.

I like winning but it’s more than, “I win, you lose.”

At the winner’s circle there’s a lot of hoopla. If the big fuss is the return for my investment I feel empty.

The best part of winning is gratitude. I’m thankful for people, of what I did right or had to do over, and knowing how far I have come.

My rocking chair is always ready.

Winning rocks.

 

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Trial and Try Again

As an art practitioner I think about art and my relationship to my work. Part of that connection to the work is how to love it.

I have a design, a plan, a pattern in mind, sometimes. Often I ‘go’ with a marker or a brush.  Some of my favorite pieces come from this exercise.

I, and bets are you too, will be required to write or to tell about your art. The artist’s statement invites others into your art. People will make up their own minds.

Often the writing or telling is about what remains when I finish.  That does not discourage me. Critics abound. I do not take on that job.

The key is to take encouragement from finishing your work.

It is fine to say, “I really don’t know what I was going for but here it is.” I created a plan and a little way in I changed it.  Starting over is exciting. Re-beginning turns my calendar on its side and presses me and my resources. Pressure is good, but like the air on your lungs—just right.

I like “trial and try again”.

Love your work.

What can be Will Be

My usual method to assemblage starts with some kind of “ground” or what receives all the pieces. Then comes the parts arrangement. Take a picture; then, re-arrange the components, and finally take another picture.

Flow of the Cosmos2

“Star Fountain”, wood, metal, acrylic paint, varnish, April 2016

I’ve  mixed it up a bit.  I take a picture of the parts and cut them out, then arrange those cut-outs on a backdrop.

I thought, “Forget the pictures.”

Designs?

Where am I?

I’m stuck is where I am.

I have to do better. Don’t give up.

Opportunity to re-start.

 

I was jammed. Run hard a-ground.

What I used to make this project was one word: altered.

I altered the plan.

It worked. Same parts different approach. New concept.

I got un-stuck.

New tool for my tool box.

What can be will be.

Eventually.

Stay in the hunt.