Being ready by Design

Whenever I am in the notion to work I do not want to have to struggle with tools, find things I need, clear off messy work surfaces and do double work type work to make something. I am a one person shop-studio- en plein air Artist. It is up to me to give myself every advantage I am able.

Junk in Plastic Boxes

Containers on a shelf. Like things with like things. 

On the bus I have my tools in a neat vintage Lands End™. One zipper and a snap I am ready to read or sketch. The other places I create are fairly organized, but just. I can wander between projects and return to the easel over many days. Tools line the drawers and parts and pieces fill bins, containers, and the occasional peanut butter jar.

I make it a rule to finish projects– they may not be perfect, that doesn’t matter, I complete my work. Work I’ve promised by a deadline gets to the person before the deadline. If something is needed by Thursday and I get it Monday the piece is ready on Wednesday before 5 p.m.

Because I’m cool? Nope. Because I don’t like things hanging over my head. Besides it’s my word that is worth more than the project I’m working on. If I lose my good name, even if it’s not my fault, then I cannot buy it back.

Brushes cleaned and ready

A process of brush care at the end of a session.

So I keep tools, materials, and work spaces ready for work. I won’t win any awards from minimalist decor folks. I can find anything and I can usually remember where I have filed most of my stuff. That’s my test. Keep like things with like things; label the drawers; use clear containers with labels; put up things as I go and simple processes like that. This keeps something like a mess from hanging over my head.

As I typed before, I admit I won’t win at perfection, zero mess, just a bit of wisdom in the seeming madness. I have a shop-vac, several brooms and dust pants, even a magnet on a rope when needed.

Note I didn’t say “rules”. When things are ‘supposed to be’ done a certain way, or controlled this way, or filled with judgment I usually baulk, or “buck-up” as the Aunties used to say.

Rules are fine but if I make a process that functions well, it will not be perfect. I might leave my acrylic paints all out, in trays that go into a cabinet when I’m finished, but I want to see my materials. It’s like when I get new color pencils–that excites me. I can’t wait to use the new pencil. I’ll even start a new page just to incorporate it into the composition or just go crazy mono-chrome.

Leaving an organized neat area dedicated to acrylics, or oils, or wood-block, or just my easels helps me organize my day-week-month. It’s like my “visual-control” for my project management. I can manage what I see and I “go-and-see” continuously as “walk-around-management” of myself. Big job.

Raygun Build Parts

Selected items ready for  a project.

I know by working with materials on a daily basis, seeing them regularly, and monitoring my progress what I need to replenish. I don’t have duplicated materials, nor do I run out of 20% gray pencils at 3:00 am Sunday morning. I don’t waste time looking for materials and resources; I don’t have waste in duplicated items–6 pounds of “sinker” nails is more than I need for this project–and I keep a re-order list and make a time to order as needed. I also keep a list of items to trade, give away, or sell.

These concepts help me keep my spaces ready to work. Organized for production is what I like to call it. It’s also a fun way to engage with the materials, to bring an idea or inspiration to the front and spring-board into the work.

I have to make the most of every opportunity I make or every time I get the chance to make something that I think is cool. When I’m ready to get busy I am more motivated to do just that.

Going to the shop or to the studio not a struggle, it’s a pleasure.  By design.

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A Study in Green

I will reduce the number of my unfinished projects.

The reasons I fall back on for why I fail to finish a project are killing my creative drive. I realize the explanations I use for not finishing must stop. I need a plan for improvement.

I will get better at finishing projects.

Staying on task is the objective of this Study in Green.

Sometimes I use a reference. This time I did not use a picture but I had a person in mind, so to say.

Materials

  • Old bristle brush, customized
  • Cedar shingle
  • Nearly dead acrylic paint, mix blue green (teal-ish), Phthalo green, cool gray

 

The Experiment

This was a test with minimal parameters, leaving judgment aside. Doing my best in the time allotted. Stay loose. Finish the assignment.

Parameters

  1. Portrait
  2. Make the eyes “vivid”
  3. Limited pallet – two greens plus a cool gray
  4. Twenty-five minutes

no flash 5

Results

  1. I put the brush down when the timer rang
  2. I cleaned up my mess
  3. See the photo

Astonishing Quality from an Underestimated Brush

Underestimate

 

I use paint brushes on a regular basis.

New, good brushes are expensive. I get as good a quality as I can afford when I buy them. I barter for brushes. I am giddy to find brushes in second-hand shops that show something of their character. Sometimes I get old brushes for free.

I do not take my brushes for granted. Constant brush care is part of the work. That does not change the fact: I am tough on brushes. Not on purpose but it seems they do not last so long.

I learned to never underestimate what lies within a brush. That is especially so when a brush seems to have given its last best effort in my rough hands.

For in my failure to render a fuller estimation of a battered and bruised brush I have had to, by necessity, ask for more, just a little more of those bristles. I have learned not to paint with a “stock” brush.

I have made brushes of amazing utility and unique application with a simple pair of scissors. The renewed brushes respond with astonishing vigor.

Inside every “stock” brush is a new pedigree ready for one more chance to shade, to line, and to scrub.

And to change the world as a customized sidekick to a rough-handed cheapskate.